Prankster creates Brighton and Hove’s first skateboard lane

Bus lanes and cycle lanes are commonplace in Brighton and Hove – but now a practical joker has created the city’s first skateboard lane.

Skateboard lane markings. Picture by Clive Andrews.

Skateboard lane markings. Picture by Clive Andrews.

For every bicycle mark along the Hove Lawns cycle lane, a skateboard mark has been painted to match it.

The markings were spotted by keen Brighton cyclist Clive Andrews, who posted this picture of them on Twitter.

He praised the “markings for tiny-wheeled plank users” saying  “I think it’s pukka.”

Fellow Twitter user @seasons_sitcom, discussing who has priority in the lane, cyclists or skateboarders, joked: “The law is thus: if the skater is aged 20+ ask them to do a trick. If they can’t they must make way #onlyfair.”

However, any tiny-wheeled plank users should get down quick if they want to use it.

A council spokesman said: “These are not official markings and we will be arranging for them to be removed to avoid any confusion, as the cycle lane is intended  for cyclists only.”

  1. Rolivan Reply

    While they are wasting money removing them instead of putting the time to cleaning off the Chewing Gum strewn Pavements

  2. Rolivan Reply

    While they are wasting money removing them instead of putting the time to cleaning off the Chewing Gum strewn Pavements

  3. Rolivan Reply

    While they are wasting money removing them instead of putting the time to cleaning off the Chewing Gum strewn Pavements

  4. talled Reply

    I wish more cyclists would use the lanes especially along the seafront, there always seems to be some lycra clad twit refusing to move over to the vastly expensive but ultimately safer dedicated track.

  5. talled Reply

    I wish more cyclists would use the lanes especially along the seafront, there always seems to be some lycra clad twit refusing to move over to the vastly expensive but ultimately safer dedicated track.

  6. talled Reply

    I wish more cyclists would use the lanes especially along the seafront, there always seems to be some lycra clad twit refusing to move over to the vastly expensive but ultimately safer dedicated track.

  7. buz bunker Reply

    This is a place holder post for when I have time to have a moan-up later.

  8. buz bunker Reply

    This is a place holder post for when I have time to have a moan-up later.

  9. buz bunker Reply

    This is a place holder post for when I have time to have a moan-up later.

  10. Clive Reply

    talled – The seafront is a perfect example of why some people choose to use the road rather than a cyclepath.

    Did you know that for over two years, the path has been interrupted by a long section of building work? It’s impossible to ride the cyclepath all along the seafront. And even where cyclepaths do exist – they’re often, narrow, convoluted, full of pedestrians, glass, or – in some locations – cars. The road can sometimes be the safest place to be.

    In any case, cyclepaths are only ever an option. People have a choice of which road to use to reach their destination, and that applies whether they’re using cars or bikes.

  11. Clive Reply

    talled – The seafront is a perfect example of why some people choose to use the road rather than a cyclepath.

    Did you know that for over two years, the path has been interrupted by a long section of building work? It’s impossible to ride the cyclepath all along the seafront. And even where cyclepaths do exist – they’re often, narrow, convoluted, full of pedestrians, glass, or – in some locations – cars. The road can sometimes be the safest place to be.

    In any case, cyclepaths are only ever an option. People have a choice of which road to use to reach their destination, and that applies whether they’re using cars or bikes.

  12. Clive Reply

    talled – The seafront is a perfect example of why some people choose to use the road rather than a cyclepath.

    Did you know that for over two years, the path has been interrupted by a long section of building work? It’s impossible to ride the cyclepath all along the seafront. And even where cyclepaths do exist – they’re often, narrow, convoluted, full of pedestrians, glass, or – in some locations – cars. The road can sometimes be the safest place to be.

    In any case, cyclepaths are only ever an option. People have a choice of which road to use to reach their destination, and that applies whether they’re using cars or bikes.

  13. feline1 Reply

    I saw these this morning. “Hilarious” vandalism, just what we need.

    Your photo also illustrates nicely how the council never trim the edges of the lawns so ever year they encroach further over the already-too-narrow cycle lane. (It’s not too bad at the bit in that photo, but it’s about half a foot in places.)

  14. feline1 Reply

    I saw these this morning. “Hilarious” vandalism, just what we need.

    Your photo also illustrates nicely how the council never trim the edges of the lawns so ever year they encroach further over the already-too-narrow cycle lane. (It’s not too bad at the bit in that photo, but it’s about half a foot in places.)

  15. feline1 Reply

    I saw these this morning. “Hilarious” vandalism, just what we need.

    Your photo also illustrates nicely how the council never trim the edges of the lawns so ever year they encroach further over the already-too-narrow cycle lane. (It’s not too bad at the bit in that photo, but it’s about half a foot in places.)

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