Three weeks of roadworks to repair award-winning Seven Dials roundabout after less than three years

Posted On 12 Sep 2016 at 4:19 pm

An award-winning new Brighton roundabout which was only installed three years ago is to get three weeks of roadworks to correct defects which have seen its kerbstones crumbling.

The roundabout in October 2014

The roundabout in October 2014

The changes to the Seven Dials roundabout courted controversy from the start, with Green activist Tom Druitt, now a councillor, climbing an elm tree for several days to successfully stop it being chopped down as part of the new layout.

Once installed, the roundabout itself won awards – but eagle eyed residents soon spotted the kerbstones were crumbling after a few months.

The Medical

Bell shaped bollards were installed to stop lorries and other heavy goods vehicles crossing the central island – and now, the kerbstones will be relaid flush with the tarmac to avoid impact.

Delays should be expected during the works which are scheduled to take place between this Thursday, September 15, and Friday October 7. Lane closures, temporary traffic lights and diversions will be in place.

Repairs are needed because some of the low kerbstones encircling the roundabout have broken or come adrift. As a result changes will be made ensuring kerbstones are flush with the tarmac to avoid any impact from vehicles.

The roundabout will also be resurfaced. Some of the work will happen at night to minimise disruption.

Residents and businesses will be contacted and information posted on the council’s website.

Chair of the environment and transport committee Cllr Gill Mitchell said: “We apologise for any inconvenience this causes. The stone used in the kerbstone on the corner of the roundabout has worn quicker than anticipated.

“To prevent this in the future the kerb height will be lowered in line with the road surface.”

The previous chaotic mini-roundabout was replaced in 2013 with a longer, oval traffic island. This sought to integrate traffic more gradually instead of vehicles converging on a central point.