Bike sheds granted a reprieve

Posted On 04 Aug 2014 at 5:49 pm
By :

Two bike sheds which fell foul of planning regulations have been given a temporary reprieve following an outpouring of public support.

Kieran Barnard's bike shed

Kieran Barnard’s bike shed

Two families who built the sheds in their front gardens in Bates Road were last month sent enforcement letters by Brighton and Hove City Council, who said they must be taken down.

But two weeks after Brighton and Hove News reported the story, the council has had a rethink and enforcement will be put on hold while officers see if another resolution can be found.

The owner of one of the sheds, Kieran Barnard said: “We are delighted because we were expecting a red letter from the council any day, so that gives a bit of breathing space.

“We understand the council’s position in a way, because there shouldn’t be a planning free for all, but by this token we want a local development plan to include bike sheds.

It’s a bit of a shame that it’s taken a public outcry. But what was really nice was all the comments from the public which have been overwhelmingly in favour of the residents.”

The latest development is down in small part to Councillor Ann Norman, who said: “Our discussions with officers have resulted in an agreement for planning officers to explore options to find out how other local authorities deal with similar issues with bike storage and whilst these discussions are taking place, enforcement to remove the two bike sheds mentioned above will be put on hold.”

However, the news has come too late for Mr Barnard’s neighbour Tom Atkins, who has already torn down his bike shed after he failed to get retrospective planning permission for it.  If he wants to rebuild it, he will need to appeal to the planning inspectorate.

She added that initial reports that 21 properties had been sent enforcement letters were incorrect – she and Conservative councillors had counted 21 similar sheds in Bates Road and surrounding streets, but were only aware of two current enforcement letters.

  1. Valerie Paynter Reply

    The bright blue paint is almost an invitation to passing thieves as well as ensuring it is an eyesore. A feature even! Painting it to match brickwork or green and growing, say, clematis climber plantings over it, would go a long way towards making it fit in and look like it belongs there.

  2. Valerie Paynter Reply

    The bright blue paint is almost an invitation to passing thieves as well as ensuring it is an eyesore. A feature even! Painting it to match brickwork or green and growing, say, clematis climber plantings over it, would go a long way towards making it fit in and look like it belongs there.

  3. @theplanorak Reply

    A local development order could grant planning permission for a shed subject to constraints such as where it is in the city, location on site, size, design, materials, colour etc. A simple guide for householders would explain these and the Council could even ask for details to be submitted so they could confirm within LDO criteria, to give legal protection for a small fee.

  4. @theplanorak Reply

    A local development order could grant planning permission for a shed subject to constraints such as where it is in the city, location on site, size, design, materials, colour etc. A simple guide for householders would explain these and the Council could even ask for details to be submitted so they could confirm within LDO criteria, to give legal protection for a small fee.

  5. Pingback: Brighton & Hove council grants bike shed reprieve | Cycling Feeds

  6. Pingback: Brighton & Hove council grants bike shed reprieve | Cycling Feeds

Leave a Reply

*

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.