Health officials to review pharmacies in Brighton and Hove

Posted On 07 Feb 2014 at 10:32 am

Health officials are to carry out a review of pharmacies in Brighton and Hove over the next 12 months.

The aim is to assess whether the existing 59 pharmacies in Brighton and Hove meet the needs of the people who live and work in and visit the area.

A key slice of their income comes through a national contract with the Department of Health. Locally they receive almost £4 million, excluding fees and allowances.

The review was discussed by the Brighton and Hove City Council Health and Wellbeing Board at Hove Town Hall on Wednesday (5 February).

Councillor Anne Meadows told the board that there were no pharmacies in Moulsecoomb.

She said: “We have a GP surgery but people then have to get a bus down the Lewes Road. Within 50 yards in the Lewes Road, you’ve got two.”

Councillor Meadows said that her ward included some of the poorest people in the city who had to pay for transport if they needed a prescription.

She added that it was costly for people in her ward – Moulsecoomb and Bevendean – and not good for their health and wellbeing.

The last Pharmaceutical Needs Assessment showed that people in Moulsecoomb had some of the longest travel times to the nearest chemist on foot or by public transport.

Councillor Geoffrey Bowden said that, when the review started, it would be helpful if those carrying out the review could consult the local Older People’s Council.

The next Pharmaceutical Needs Assessment has to be approved by April next year after a 60-day consultation.

  1. Russell Saunders Reply

    “Councillor Anne Meadows told the board that there were no pharmacies in Moulsecoomb”

    Has she not visited the area? There is a Kamson pharmacy at the bottom of The Avenue just over the road from the doctors surgery that she speaks of.

  2. Russell Saunders Reply

    “Councillor Anne Meadows told the board that there were no pharmacies in Moulsecoomb”

    Has she not visited the area? There is a Kamson pharmacy at the bottom of The Avenue just over the road from the doctors surgery that she speaks of.

  3. Liesa Saunders Reply

    Errrrr we have Kamsons opposite the GP surgery at the junction of Hillside and The Avenue, there is also Sharps up Coombe Road and Westons along Lewes road, Asda also have a pharmacy, not sure whereabouts Anne Meadows is but she really needs to open her eyes a bit more? maybe they need one further into North Moulscoomb i dont know what they have a long there …. but as Dr Hackings surgery is opposite the shop think thats adequate?

  4. Liesa Saunders Reply

    Errrrr we have Kamsons opposite the GP surgery at the junction of Hillside and The Avenue, there is also Sharps up Coombe Road and Westons along Lewes road, Asda also have a pharmacy, not sure whereabouts Anne Meadows is but she really needs to open her eyes a bit more? maybe they need one further into North Moulscoomb i dont know what they have a long there …. but as Dr Hackings surgery is opposite the shop think thats adequate?

  5. BRIAN CREMER Reply

    I sent you an email in March- to which I have had no reply – concerning our local pharmacy, which has since gone from bad to worse and now, in my view, dangerous.

    In the latest episode yesterday, when we called to pick up prescriptions entered last Thursday (6 days ago), one had 6 items missing out of eight on my prescription and my wife’s was unfilled. My wife waited thirty minutes for the items to be filled, together with fifteen other patients, several of whom were complaining about having to return for the third time.

    After observing the customary confusion of puzzled looking staff shuffling through forms and searching the racks, my wife asked to see whoever was in charge. She was then told, following the usual finger pointing at the medical centre, which is highly efficient and reliable, that a new system is being implemented whereby we will have to phone them two weeks prior to submitting a prescription, so they can obtain the medication. We must then phone again to confirm before collection. They’ll need an army of phone agents!!!

    On returning home my wife found two items with her name on, but which are not prescribed for her. This is where it is getting dangerous! This has been going on now for at least three years and despite repeated promises, nothing changes. It’s time it did and we want to see it happen before someone dies.

  6. BRIAN CREMER Reply

    I sent you an email in March- to which I have had no reply – concerning our local pharmacy, which has since gone from bad to worse and now, in my view, dangerous.

    In the latest episode yesterday, when we called to pick up prescriptions entered last Thursday (6 days ago), one had 6 items missing out of eight on my prescription and my wife’s was unfilled. My wife waited thirty minutes for the items to be filled, together with fifteen other patients, several of whom were complaining about having to return for the third time.

    After observing the customary confusion of puzzled looking staff shuffling through forms and searching the racks, my wife asked to see whoever was in charge. She was then told, following the usual finger pointing at the medical centre, which is highly efficient and reliable, that a new system is being implemented whereby we will have to phone them two weeks prior to submitting a prescription, so they can obtain the medication. We must then phone again to confirm before collection. They’ll need an army of phone agents!!!

    On returning home my wife found two items with her name on, but which are not prescribed for her. This is where it is getting dangerous! This has been going on now for at least three years and despite repeated promises, nothing changes. It’s time it did and we want to see it happen before someone dies.

  7. Valerie Paynter Reply

    Pharmacies have been a big part of my life for 24 years of first dialysis and secondly my transplant. Mistakes both on the ward when drugs are being dispensed from trolleys and from pharmacies are something I have experienced and always been able to catch.

    Except for once, when a drip was put up a day or so after my transplant and the top of my head started prickling/fizzing. Down it came with me being accused of exaggerating. To this day there is a tiny strobing effect at the bottom of my field of vision which I see in the dark which came from that event. What was the drug? Never been able to get them to tell me. I moved on.

    Hospital ward mistakes most usually happen when agency nurses are on duty and unfamiliar with patients, the hospital, ward, rushed, whatever. It happened to me in 1991, 2001 (when moved to another ward temporarily)and most recently, when I was an inpatient in June 2011 and again in June 2012 and had it happen. The nurse failed to give what she had not seen in the notes as having been prescribed. Whst if I had not been sharp enough or well enough to notice?

    I have had the odd rare mistake from pharmacies, but fewer I have to say! You need your wits about you when taking any prescribed drug. They make mistakes…so do patients. We arn’t machines.

  8. Valerie Paynter Reply

    Pharmacies have been a big part of my life for 24 years of first dialysis and secondly my transplant. Mistakes both on the ward when drugs are being dispensed from trolleys and from pharmacies are something I have experienced and always been able to catch.

    Except for once, when a drip was put up a day or so after my transplant and the top of my head started prickling/fizzing. Down it came with me being accused of exaggerating. To this day there is a tiny strobing effect at the bottom of my field of vision which I see in the dark which came from that event. What was the drug? Never been able to get them to tell me. I moved on.

    Hospital ward mistakes most usually happen when agency nurses are on duty and unfamiliar with patients, the hospital, ward, rushed, whatever. It happened to me in 1991, 2001 (when moved to another ward temporarily)and most recently, when I was an inpatient in June 2011 and again in June 2012 and had it happen. The nurse failed to give what she had not seen in the notes as having been prescribed. Whst if I had not been sharp enough or well enough to notice?

    I have had the odd rare mistake from pharmacies, but fewer I have to say! You need your wits about you when taking any prescribed drug. They make mistakes…so do patients. We arn’t machines.

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