Hove Conservatives to pick parliamentary candidate tomorrow

Posted On 29 Jul 2014 at 1:57 pm

Local Conservative Party members are due to meet tomorrow (Wednesday 30 July) to choose a candidate to stand in Hove at the next general election.

The selection process is under way because the sitting MP Mike Weatherley announced this month that he would step down in May next year when the election is due to be held.

The shortlist is expected to contain two or three names. Before the shortlist was decided, a party member said there was one name that many hoped to see – Graham Cox. Councillor Cox is the newest member of the opposition Conservative group on Brighton and Hove City Council, having won the Westbourne by-election in December 2011.

At 52 he is not quite the youngest Tory councillor. And he came to active party politics late in life, having served first as a police officer for 30 years.

He was born in Portslade. He joined Sussex Police in his teens. He rose to become the last borough commander in Hove and headed the Criminal Investigation Department (CID) as a detective chief superintendent. He stepped up to acting assistant chief constable a few times before a stint at the Home Office, working for the National Police Improvement Agency.

Councillor Cox has won admiration across the political spectrum – even among those who profoundly disagree with him. One opponent said: “He clearly has a social conscience and he’s not the most tribal of Tories.” He is patient, courteous and good humoured in the council chamber. Yet it’s hard to imagine that he rose through the force without an element of steel.

Kristy Adams and Graham Cox

Kristy Adams and Graham Cox

That element of steel – and the single-mindedness that goes with it – means that Councillor Cox has at times upset those who might be counted among his natural supporters. He surprised political friends and foes – and was vilified in some quarters – for supporting 20mph speed limits. He also backed changes to the Seven Dials having seen, as a police officer, the results of too many nasty crashes.

He has also surprised some during debates about homelessness and travellers, suggesting pragmatic solutions. A political opponent said: “He may have a social conscience but he probably doesn’t qualify as a bleeding heart liberal.”

Another political rival said: “He doesn’t always say what you’d expect. He seems to be his own man and he thinks about things.”

Now, most voters might like to believe that politicians always think about things but it’s a luxury for many. Relatively few show signs of having the time or inclination. Party politics is a tribal pursuit and those who run for office are bound by party discipline – and that includes toeing the party line on most issues most of the time.

In the past Councillor Cox has said that he would favour a strong local candidate who could connect with the electorate. But he wasn’t averse to an able outsider who could win a seat at the expense of a weaker more local contender putting victory at risk.

Who else might he face tomorrow? The shortlist is likely to include Kristy Adams, 43, a businesswoman with a council seat in Bedford. She’s been active in the party in Brighton and Hove in recent weeks. Opponents have mocked her attempts on social media to promote her local credentials but she is from the area and has had a home in Hove longer than some of them realise.

Whoever the party chooses will be expected to begin campaigning soon. With nine months to go, Peter Kyle, who is standing for Labour, and Christopher Hawtree, the Green Party choice, have already made a start. Recent contests suggest a two-way Tory v Labour scrap.

One local Conservative said: “We know Kristy’s up for it. And she has all the makings of a great candidate. But in Graham, we have someone who plenty of voters already know and trust – and that counts for a lot when time is so short.” Tomorrow the Tories will make their choice. Next May it’ll be up to the voters of Hove.

  1. Christopher Hawtree Reply

    The seat is in fact Hove and Portslade.

    Curiously, Cllr Cox has in recent weeks said several times that I shall be the next MP. Whether he revises that opinion should he be chosen, we will see. He might have to miss some of the cricket!

  2. Christopher Hawtree Reply

    The seat is in fact Hove and Portslade.

    Curiously, Cllr Cox has in recent weeks said several times that I shall be the next MP. Whether he revises that opinion should he be chosen, we will see. He might have to miss some of the cricket!

  3. Gerald Wiley Reply

    @Christopher Hawtree – Graham Cox might be using irony…have you seen what the greens have done to Portslade (unfortunately)?

    I’d recommend you don’t give up your day job just yet.

  4. Gerald Wiley Reply

    @Christopher Hawtree – Graham Cox might be using irony…have you seen what the greens have done to Portslade (unfortunately)?

    I’d recommend you don’t give up your day job just yet.

  5. Fred Long Reply

    It is disturbing to see the Green candidate doesn’t know the name of the seat he hopes to represent. It is called Hove. Check the Parliament website or Wikipedia for starters. The sitting MP styles himself the member for Hove and Portslade but it’s not within his gift to change the name of the constituency.

  6. Fred Long Reply

    It is disturbing to see the Green candidate doesn’t know the name of the seat he hopes to represent. It is called Hove. Check the Parliament website or Wikipedia for starters. The sitting MP styles himself the member for Hove and Portslade but it’s not within his gift to change the name of the constituency.

  7. Tel Scoomer Reply

    My MP, Simon Kirby, does something similar. He calls himself the MP for Brighton Kemptown and Peacehaven. It’s just called Brighton Kemptown.

  8. Tel Scoomer Reply

    My MP, Simon Kirby, does something similar. He calls himself the MP for Brighton Kemptown and Peacehaven. It’s just called Brighton Kemptown.

  9. Jacqui Bonfield Reply

    This is clearly a stitch up. The normal selection process for a seat involves 10 / 15 people being interviewed by the local party. The final three go to either open primary or an all member selection.

    This time they’ve gone straight to a final 3. Whoever is trying to stitch it up for Graham is obviously frightened that he might not be selected if he faces stronger competition. It’s a particular shame because there are some very strong female candidates that locals will never get to see.

    I’m surprised the Conservative Party doesn’t put more protection into a selection that could result in the person becoming an MP.

    Peter Kyle must be delighted.

  10. Jacqui Bonfield Reply

    This is clearly a stitch up. The normal selection process for a seat involves 10 / 15 people being interviewed by the local party. The final three go to either open primary or an all member selection.

    This time they’ve gone straight to a final 3. Whoever is trying to stitch it up for Graham is obviously frightened that he might not be selected if he faces stronger competition. It’s a particular shame because there are some very strong female candidates that locals will never get to see.

    I’m surprised the Conservative Party doesn’t put more protection into a selection that could result in the person becoming an MP.

    Peter Kyle must be delighted.

  11. Pat Breslin Reply

    I imagine this will be the final three after a round of interviews. You couldn’t just have the agent select a final three, that would be undemocratic and an insult to local party members. It only takes a day to interview a round of candidates, I’m guessing they did it last week.

    Hove Tories, let us know how you’ve done this. Why did we not get a chance of an open primary?

  12. Pat Breslin Reply

    I imagine this will be the final three after a round of interviews. You couldn’t just have the agent select a final three, that would be undemocratic and an insult to local party members. It only takes a day to interview a round of candidates, I’m guessing they did it last week.

    Hove Tories, let us know how you’ve done this. Why did we not get a chance of an open primary?

  13. Tel Scoomer Reply

    Do any of the parties hold open primaries? I haven’t seen any adverts or editorial reports to suggest they do. I suspect voters like me would have greater trust in the parties were they to be more open and transparent – and democracy would be better served. But the Tories don’t appear to be any better or worse in this regard than the others.

  14. Tel Scoomer Reply

    Do any of the parties hold open primaries? I haven’t seen any adverts or editorial reports to suggest they do. I suspect voters like me would have greater trust in the parties were they to be more open and transparent – and democracy would be better served. But the Tories don’t appear to be any better or worse in this regard than the others.

  15. Fred Long Reply

    Kristy Adams appears to be a Conservative Central Office candidate with local connections. Graham Cox is steeped in this area, has solid professional credentials, including in public service, and commands a great deal of respect. We shouldn’t fear an able outsider but, with 9 months until the election, it may be unwise to take the risk. If Kristy Adams is as able as she seems and has party backing, i am sure she will find a suitable seat.

  16. Fred Long Reply

    Kristy Adams appears to be a Conservative Central Office candidate with local connections. Graham Cox is steeped in this area, has solid professional credentials, including in public service, and commands a great deal of respect. We shouldn’t fear an able outsider but, with 9 months until the election, it may be unwise to take the risk. If Kristy Adams is as able as she seems and has party backing, i am sure she will find a suitable seat.

  17. Jake P Reply

    Good spot Jacqui, they’ve put their anointed candidate up against someone who stood against them recently (so wont be liked by the local party), and another candidate who will probably turn out to be quite weak. Didn’t want anyone upsetting the coronation. Same old tories.

  18. Jake P Reply

    Good spot Jacqui, they’ve put their anointed candidate up against someone who stood against them recently (so wont be liked by the local party), and another candidate who will probably turn out to be quite weak. Didn’t want anyone upsetting the coronation. Same old tories.

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