£350k Dyke Road cycle lane set for approval

Posted On 01 Oct 2014 at 4:09 pm

A new cycle lane along Dyke Road which aims to build upon pro-cycling changes along Old Shoreham Road and at the Seven Dials looks likely to get the go-ahead.

Dyke Road cycle lanesPlans for the £350,000 lane between The Upper Drive and Old Shoreham Road have been recommended for approval by Brighton and Hove City Council’s Environment, Transport and Sustainability Committee which meets on Tuesday (7 October).

The lane, which will lead to the loss of about 20 parking spaces, was originally proposed earlier this year but the scheme has been amended after a consultation.

A report to the committee said: “Recent improvements to the pedestrian and cycle network have been made in the vicinity of Dyke Road to improve conditions for active travel including at Old Shoreham Road and Seven Dials.

“The proposals to create a supportive, safe and encouraging environment for active, sustainable travel along this section of Dyke Road are key to addressing pressure on the transport network and building on the success of these previously constructed schemes.”

The scheme will be paid for with £250,000 from government transport funding and £95,700 from BHASVIC (Brighton, Hove and Sussex VI Form College) as a condition of planning permission for its extension.

The lane is split into two main sections. From The Upper Drive to Port Hall Road there will be

  • a 1.5m wide on-street cycle lane between the pavement and the road in both directions
  • build-outs at pedestrian crossings removed to provide carriageway width for the cycle lane
  • the carriageway at existing pelican crossing areas raised to provide a level crossing surface for pedestrians
  • a new junction layout at the corner of Port Hall Road
  • the northernmost northbound bus stop relocated closer to the corner of The Upper Drive

And from Old Shoreham Road to Porthall Road

  • existing parking bays will be removed with users displaced to adjacent streets
  • new cycle lanes between the pavement and the road raised above the level of the road
  • localised carriageway widening will be required to provide 1.5m cycle lanes
  • minimum 3.05m traffic lanes
  • the southbound bus stop will be relocated closer to Port Hall Road
  1. HJarrs Reply

    Good news. The Old Shoreham Rd path is becoming a catalyst for development. This route now needs to continue into the city centre.

  2. mark Reply

    No it isn’t good news at all.
    More cycle lanes is always bad news and a waste of money.

  3. Perri Reply

    Why do Bhasvic have to pay as s condition of being allowed to build an extension?

  4. Chris Reply

    HJarrs .. in what way is the Old Shoreham Road path becoming a catalyst for development? Development of what – more cycle paths? I did see a cyclist there the other day, riding on the pavement.

    How long will that stretch of Dyke Road be closed while the work doesn’t get anywhere fast? Sounds like another six month job blocking off a main artery into Brighton.

  5. feline1 Reply

    Well let’s hope it’s a damn sight better than the UTTER FARCE of the rest of the Dyke Road Avenue cycle lane, which is PERMANENTLY PARKED IN by cars, and indeed the last time B&HCC’s contractor repainted the lines on the road, they couldn’t repaint most of the cycle lane ones due to the parked cars. ARRRRRRRRRGh.

  6. Warrens Reply

    Waste of money.

    How is it even possible to source money for an inessential, ‘nice to have’ project like this when there are so many things suffering from lack of money. Local and central Government all have their funding priorities wrong.

    I’m all for safer roads, but this is far from essential. Yet money is found for it. But we have under fundied health service and local child and adult social services are facing huge cuts over the next few years.

    It’s unbelievable and totally unfair.

  7. aa Reply

    Wonderful news, cycling is a great way to get around and to commute so it’s a good sign that it is getting accommodated for.

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