Pavilion Gardens will not be closed to the public says Brighton Dome

Posted On 17 Nov 2013 at 12:47 am
By :
By Jenni Davidson

Brighton Dome has rejected rumours that the Pavilion Gardens are to be closed to the public.

It had been suggested that plans to place a new wall and fence around the gardens as part of a multi-million pound makeover would lead to the public being charged for entry.

The claims originated in a post on the Facebook page of the Pavilion Gardens Café.

In a statement, Brighton Dome said: “This is the opposite of our intention. In fact we want to open up the Royal Pavilion Garden not shut it off.”

“The gardens will remain a free resource for both local communities and visitors to the city.”

The gardens may be closed overnight to prevent anti-social behaviour and for occasional special events, such as outdoor theatre performances.

Otherwise they will continue to be open to the public as they are now.

Other fears raised in the café’s Facebook post were that mature elm trees would be cut down, entrances to the gardens closed off and the gardens privatised.

Brighton Dome stated that those too were unfounded.

The refurbishment of the Pavilion Gardens forms part of a £35m project to renovate the Royal Pavilion, Brighton Dome and Brighton Museum and Art Gallery.

It is thought that the refurbishment of the Pavilion Gardens will require the café to bemoved to a new location within the gardens.

The owners and customers of the Pavilion Gardens Café are campaigning to retain the café in its present position.

A support group, Friends of the Pavilion Gardens Café, has threatened to oppose plans for the entire project if a guarantee is not given that the café and patio will be preserved.

A comment posted on the group’s Facebook page reads: “[U]nless we get a quick and clear statement that the cafe building and patio will remain, we are going to make sure the objections are heard in all four corners of the earth, which includes the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Arts Council”.

The current Art Deco-style Pavilion Gardens Café building was built in 1950.

A café in the Pavilion Gardens has been run the Sewell family since 1941.

  1. David Sewell Reply

    Just to reply simply to the above:- There has been no consultation on any plans, sketches, drawings or artists impressions on any part of the scheme in the Pavilion Gardens to date and the HLF Bid will be sent in by the end of November. If the Council / Dome think this is appropriate behaviour with regard to the Royal Pavilion Gardens then that says something. They should have had Jim Mayor of BHCC Major projects working on the proposals, he gets participation from the electorate, runs workshops and online surveys etc.

  2. David Sewell Reply

    Just to reply simply to the above:- There has been no consultation on any plans, sketches, drawings or artists impressions on any part of the scheme in the Pavilion Gardens to date and the HLF Bid will be sent in by the end of November. If the Council / Dome think this is appropriate behaviour with regard to the Royal Pavilion Gardens then that says something. They should have had Jim Mayor of BHCC Major projects working on the proposals, he gets participation from the electorate, runs workshops and online surveys etc.

  3. Valerie Paynter Reply

    I agree with you David that no bid should go to the Heritage Lottery firm using any drawings or plans (for which the grant would be given)without a proper consultation with the public.

    A National Trust style entrance at New Road would provide a natural charging point for visitors to the Royal Pavilion and events on the lawns and who knows what else. At the entrance to St. Ann’s Well Gardens one can see the remnant charging point. People used to have to pay to visit that park. It is not beyond the realms of possibility that this could become a necessity to raise funds for Pavilion Estate maintenance. As it is surrounded on three sides by buildings and walls and edifices, gating of all entry points is feasible and not that expensive compared to our no-longer railed-in parks.

    Salami slicing is a known local authority tactic. You start with one thing and slice away at it to get to somewhere else. Developers do it too. I can well believe that New Road would become the featured entrance where all entrance payments are made. Selma Montford describes her understanding of it to me as being similar to how National Trust places operate. Removal of the Sewell-run cafe and outdoor seating WOULD be replaced by coldly contemporary clone-town rubbish and food from the city-wide museums and etc. catering contractor. Which is not to be welcomed. At. All.

  4. Valerie Paynter Reply

    I agree with you David that no bid should go to the Heritage Lottery firm using any drawings or plans (for which the grant would be given)without a proper consultation with the public.

    A National Trust style entrance at New Road would provide a natural charging point for visitors to the Royal Pavilion and events on the lawns and who knows what else. At the entrance to St. Ann’s Well Gardens one can see the remnant charging point. People used to have to pay to visit that park. It is not beyond the realms of possibility that this could become a necessity to raise funds for Pavilion Estate maintenance. As it is surrounded on three sides by buildings and walls and edifices, gating of all entry points is feasible and not that expensive compared to our no-longer railed-in parks.

    Salami slicing is a known local authority tactic. You start with one thing and slice away at it to get to somewhere else. Developers do it too. I can well believe that New Road would become the featured entrance where all entrance payments are made. Selma Montford describes her understanding of it to me as being similar to how National Trust places operate. Removal of the Sewell-run cafe and outdoor seating WOULD be replaced by coldly contemporary clone-town rubbish and food from the city-wide museums and etc. catering contractor. Which is not to be welcomed. At. All.

  5. David Sewell Reply

    Can you contact me directly about your post.

  6. David Sewell Reply

    Can you contact me directly about your post.

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