Hundreds of dog walkers call on council to keep Withdean Park fencing

Posted On 02 Feb 2016 at 12:58 pm

More than a thousand people have signed a petition calling on the council to save a fence which encloses an area of Withdean Park and allows dog owners to train puppies.

Lilacs in Withdean Park by Paul Gillet on www.geograph.org.uk
The lilac enclosure was fenced off in 2000 to keep rabbits away from the newly planted flowers, but has since become known far and wide as a great place to safely let puppies and young dogs off the leash.

But the fence is now dilapidated and no longer needed to protect the lilacs, and rather than spend £10,000 replacing it, Brighton and Hove City Council is planning on dismantling it – to the dismay of dog owners, hundreds of whom have signed a petition protesting the plans.

But the move has been welcomed by the Friends of Withdean Park (FoWP), who say they are fed up with the dog mess left in the park, in particular by commercial dog walkers.

The petition reads: “Withdean Park fenced space is a unique facility in the Brighton area that is popular with local residents and people from wider afield, alike.

“It is a safe destination for dog walkers that attracts many families and young children wishing to spend time outdoors with other likeminded dog owners.

“For the council just to decide to withdraw maintenance of such a popular resource without trialling other ways to fund and support this vital community facility (such as a low-cost toll scheme or leasing a cafe site to generate revenue – both of which would encourage more creative and even wider use of the park by the public) is not responsible and amounts to short-sighted management of the city’s park.”

Stuart Derwent, FoWP committee member, said: “At our 2015 AGM in June a council officer said that the fencing was coming to the end of its life and the council was unlikely to replace or maintain it.

“Their view was that it is a health and safety issue with it becoming dangerous. Those FoWP members present were generally against the retention of the fence. Their particular concern was the increasing amount of dog muck not picked up.

“This was felt to be largely due to the increasing use of the enclosure by commercial dog walkers who frequently had six or more dogs with them. It was considered impossible to keep an eye on and clean up after such a number.

“The FoWP view is that the fate of the fencing is in the hands of the city council.”

The deterioration of the fence has coincided with the downgrading of the lilac collection, which lost its national collection status in 2006. The fence was also damaged by travellers, some of whom drove through the fencing at the top and bottom and removed paving slabs and timber.

Mr Derwent added that the FoWP were far more concerned about cuts to the council ranger service, which in turn meant volunteer groups such as theirs would be left with little support to carry out park maintenance.

A council spokeswoman said: “Due to reductions in funding from central government the council has to find savings of around £68m over the next few years. All council budgets are therefore under intense and continuing scrutiny.

“With regard to fencing and parks, the council is giving priority to maintaining fencing around children’s play areas.

“The fencing in Withdean Park was originally put in to protect a national lilac collection from rabbits. There are still lilacs in the park but there is no longer a national collection.

“Although no longer needed for its original purpose, staff and volunteers have kept the fence in place as they are aware that it is popular with dog walkers. While this was a matter of putting the odd new post in, it could be managed within budget.

“The fence has now deteriorated to a state where it needs replacing at an estimated cost of £10,000 which the current parks budget won’t stretch to.

“However, we are always interested in new income streams for parks and if external funds could be raised for the replacement and maintenance of the fence then it would certainly be considered.”

  1. jan simms Reply

    All the cut backs lead to a dumbing down of life, and a National Lilac collection is educational as well as adding to the beauty of an amenity, it is sad that it has gone. Brighton Council seems to lack a horticultural voice. .Fencing providing an area to train an exercise dogs seems a sensible course of action in a time when so many badly behaved dogs cause horrific headlines.
    The dogs should clear the rabbits, and if council cannot afford to repair the fencing, there are other ways of raising funds well within the scope of internet savvy residents of Brighton. Sponsorship, on line funding site or even a fund for contributions from the hundreds of dog walkers for starters.
    When our tiny village set its mind to raising funds for a kids playground, it did so, it just took a few active persistent fund raisers to awaken the rest to utilise the existing sources to raise funds.
    As for the failing to clear up their dogs shit, DNA is available now, or get other park users to phone photo culprits and send them to the dog warden.

  2. Ray Reply

    Withdean Park has been allowed to deteriorate for some time now through less support from Parks and Gardens .. leading to a failing Lilac collection and mature trees then this proposal to remove the fence that encourages puppy walkers.
    Friends of the park have done a sterling job over the years but it’s clear the battle is almost lost since they too have lost support.
    Why?? THERE IS NO MORE MONEY!!
    Preston Park; Hove Park; Stanmer Park etc are more prestigious and therefore get the funding.
    The PUPPY PARK … will soon be inhabited by travelers then ultimately will be either high rise housing or another care home.
    Enjoy it while it lasts.

  3. Coralie Reply

    The friends of Withdean Park claim that they are fed up with dog mess. I walk a dog there frenquently. The other dog owners are responsible and pick up after their dogs and there simply isn’t dogs mess left in the park.

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